The Potential Number of Songs Is Infinite

I forgot who said it, but a long time ago someone said that we would run out of new music. That there was only a finite number of songs and that we were close to running out of new material. You can see a modern form of this argument here. And then shortly after that Mozart (or someone like that) came on the scene and proved him/her totally wrong.

Mozart

Well, it seems like an untestable hypothesis to me, something you can’t prove or disprove. So, instead of trying to figure this out logically, I’ll just say where my feelings lie…

…I feel that this assertion is baloney. The potential number of songs is infinite. As long as people are around, they will be writing more music. With an infinite number of notes to choose from, these songwriters will create an infinite number of songs. So, there will be more Mozarts, more Dylans and infinitely more songs to come.

What triggered this was, as usual, a road trip. As you know, I recently went down to South Carolina to check out the eclipse. Driving through the swamps, forests and cities of the South, I would tune into new station after new station. Rock, hip-hop, pop, college stations, top 40. Whatever, just tuning in and listening to it all. And some of the sounds coming out of the South, Georgia and North Carolina especially, are definitely new and different. I’ll be honest: I don’t like all of it or even most of it, but some of it is pretty good. And it sounds unlike what we’re listening to now. It’s fresh and different. Just when you thought the well was exhausted, up comes this pail brimming with new water. That’s how it goes.

Where does this touch fiction writing? It doesn’t directly. But, I guess, I’ve realized lately how I haven’t focused on a wide range of influences in literature. I have limited myself to a too-narrow spectrum of voices. I’ve narrowed down, too much, the infinite choices of literature that are on offer. I especially tend to read “classics” and older stuff and it’s time to mix that up. I’ve made that change in my musical diet and now I need to do it in my fiction reading diet.

So, that’s going to change. Starting now. I’ve written on this blog about Hemingway, Poe, Cervantes—but now it’s time to open up the horizons a bit wider. It’s been time…I’ll let you know who it goes.


That’s all for now. I will only add that I’m still writing and, importantly, still enjoy writing fiction. There’s still nothing like creating a world from scratch—with nothing more than an idea and PC with a Word processor. I’m keeping it up and will let you know about progress here when there is something to report.

See You Next Time,

Darius

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Totality Awesome

Hey Everybody, I’m back. Ran down to South Carolina (Greenville area) last month to experience the solar eclipse…Actually to experience totality which is a totally (sorry!) different thing. It was mind-blowing. It is one of the few times when I have felt words don’t really do an event justice. Just look at it:

A total solar eclipse is seen on Monday, August 21, 2017 above Madras, Oregon. A total solar eclipse swept across a narrow portion of the contiguous United States from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. A partial solar eclipse was visible across the entire North American continent along with parts of South America, Africa, and Europe.  Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

If you find yourself near an eclipse again, I recommend getting to the totality zone so you can fully experience it. I was very suspicious/cynical before driving eight hours and spending two nights in a (meh) hotel room for an event scheduled to last two minutes. But as totality (that moment when the moon completely blocks the sun) started I began clapping and cheering. I couldn’t help myself. It was that incredible.

There are many stages to reaching totality. First, you see the crescent of the sun get smaller and smaller (the start of the eclipse). Eventually, the temperature starts to drop (in Greenville it dropped about 10 degrees Farenheit), the night animals/insects start to make noise and the sky starts to acquire a strange twilight glow. Then, the light from the sliver of sun becomes white (not yellow or orange) and there is a strange diamond ring effect. And boom! The Sun is gone and only the aurora is left. It’s a fantastical scene. Everything appears monochrome above (see the picture) and the stars begin to appear in the night sky. There is a twilight or sunset around 360 degrees on the horizon and you can hear all the crickets/cicadas thundering along at this point. It lasts for only a couple of minutes—but is sublime. Then, there is a second diamond ring effect and the sun is back. Color starts to come back and the twilight comes back as the stars fade.

It’s one of nature’s great events and this post hardly does it justice. Like I said, it is one of those few times when I feel words truly fail me. You must simply experience it.

So, next time there’s an eclipse, see if there will also be a totality. Then, book a room and grab a car/train/ship and get there for the big moment. You won’t regret it.

See you next time,

Darius