Writing, Submitting, Thinking

Guys, back at the blog again and I have little to say here for the time being. I wanted to do a longer piece today, but I’m just not feeling it. So instead of forcing the issue, here’s a little update on my writing.


Writing
I wrote a blown-out outline of a novella last weekend. It was part of my attempt to write more detailed outlines before I dive into a piece. I was happy with some of the scenes and the emotions they conjured…but…I feel that there is a significant logic problem with the plot, one I knew about all along. That logic problem is stopping me from moving forward with it until I figure out the problem. So…Bottom line: I’m going to put this one on the backburner for now. Going to let the subconscious work on that logic problem and see if it can figure it out. It’s usually pretty good at that.

That means that now I have to move onto a new work’s first draft. I’ll be selecting one soon and starting work on it. More on that below…

Submitting
Got to keep submitting. I’m still sending in my latest stories. I think they’re tight and well written. And I’ve noticed that the time to review them is taking longer. I think of this as a good sign: it usually (but not always) means that your piece is going through more gatekeepers before it gets rejected. Of course, a rejection is a still a rejection—whether it takes one day or 120 days. Your piece still doesn’t get published. But in the past I’ve noticed that the best pieces always take longer to get rejected from the get go than the merely “OK” pieces. They’re probably getting through the initial slush readers and moved up to editors before they are turned aside. So, if that’s any indication, these stories just haven’t found the right editors yet.

I’m hoping in time they will and I’ll be able to share them with you.

Thinking
As always, I’m thinking, thinking, thinking. Thinking up new ideas and writing them down. Fleshing out older ideas and writing up their plot points. I’ve even created a new “Story Ideas-Ranking” to help me rank my story ideas according to their ripeness. It’s a short list with two categories: Stories that are pretty much ready for a first draft and those that need more work. I don’t rank those in the second part, but I do rank the ones in the first. What makes a story ripe is the passion I have for the story idea, how well-defined the story is, and whether I’ve done a full formal prewrite (describing the plot, setting, characters and research needed). I take all those factors, push around the ideas on the page and one emerges on top. That’s the theory anyway.

So, this weekend, I’ll take a look at the ranking, think about which one deserves to be done next. And dive in.

Hey, “Get Black on White,” right? That’s the only way to get it done. Always has been, always will be.

Alright. See you next time,

Darius

The Craft: How to Hunt and Destroy Gerunds

[This is part of a continuing series on the art of writing fiction.]

Today’s post is for the writers out there. I’m going to put forward one quick, easy method to sharpen your later drafts. It’s a method that’s simple, but also has a little technological A Gerundtrick to it.

First thing, I’m going to assume you hate gerunds. You know, those words in English that end in –ing. Like walking, talking, etc. One thing I’ve noticed and come to loathe is the use of gerunds in my writing…Dammit…Wait…That one didn’t count…

Anyway, if you don’t hate gerunds, you should. They tend to make sentences and action weaker. And they can interrupt the flow of your story too. Just look at these sentences:

Burke was walking down the street. As he came to the intersection, he was thinking about last night, wondering if Carol had really meant what she said.

or try this:

Burke walked down the street. He came to the intersection, thought about last night and wondered if Carol had really meant what she said.

The second version, is objectively better, just like Ayn Rand said. (I jest). But seriously, I think most people would agree that the second version is stronger and better. Why? The use of verbs in their simple form without –ing, make less passive, they are stronger and  more direct.

So, how do you find and kill these little bastards? It’s easy. You can do it one by one, of course. But the best thing to do is a keyword search in your word processor. Just search for “ing” and you’ll be surprised at how often they crop up. (I was shocked the first time I did this, in fact. I had no idea I wrote so many sentences with gerunds in them.) Once you search, all you have to do is reword the sentence, usually by using the infinitive (put “to” in front of the verb) or putting it in the simple past tense. You’ll be amazed at how a little freshening up like this will help your piece.

And what about adverbs?
Some have said that adverbs (words usually ending in “ly” in English) deserve the same treatment as gerunds: get rid of them. Elmore Leonard did not like to use adverbs to modify the verb “said.” That, at least, is a pretty good idea.

I can’t go there with people who think we should get rid of ALL adverbs, but they can be used as a crutch in situations where the reader should have been able to infer how something was being done from the action and the characters. Besides, if you’re getting rid of adverbs, getting rid of adjectives can’t be far behind. Then, you’re only left with nouns and verbs and a very gray world…but I digress.

So, how to get rid of those adverbs? You got it, do a keyword search for “ly” and, again, you’ll be surprised at what crops up. I don’t always ax the adverbs, but I usually do. It’s trickier fixing them because you have to find a way to subtly make it known how things are done without hitting your reader over the head with an adverb.

But isn’t that what the craft part of writing is all about?

See you next time,

Darius